Posts Tagged ‘ruby’

Color In Bridal

Wednesday, July 27th, 2016

color in bridal

We carry an extensive range of colored gemstones, so this puts us in the frontline position for detecting new patterns and shifts in demand as they occur at retail. The newest and strongest trend at the moment is requests for bridal center stones in a variety of colored gemstones. The most popular is requests for sapphires in blues, peaches, pinks, yellows and all shades of purple. There are also requests for rubiesspinels,tourmalines … even aquamarines.

In an advisory role as a professional jeweler, we recommend that you steer away your customer from gemstones that fall short on the durability aspect, and are less than 7 ½ hardness on the Mohs scale. Those range of stones are suitable for occasional wear but since bridal jewelry gets the most beating of all, better spare the bride avoidable disappointment with her new ring.

If your sales people are not aware of this concept, it is best for them to be educated on the need to check the hardness of gems, before recommending or selling a particular gemstone for bridal wear. We are here to help you with appropriate choices. You can also visit our website for the wide range of specific gems available to you and your bride to be.

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Exciting New Gems

Wednesday, August 14th, 2013

It is always exciting to get beautiful new gemstones in, even when it means all the work of measuring, weighing, packaging, labeling, entering into inventory, and photographing. Many fresh Sapphire, Ruby, Emerald, Alexandrite, Tanzanite, Spinel, Zircon, and more are available and searchable now at GEM 2000. Take a look!

www.gem2000.com/gemsearch

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Wear-ability of Gems

Monday, August 6th, 2012

 

As a gemstone dealer who has chosen to inventory a large variety of gemstones, I am often asked about the durability and wear-ability of specific gemstones we carry. I try to answer this question by first asking:

“What piece of jewelry is this gem getting set in?”

Obviously a ring gemstone is a lot more exposed to getting knocked around than a pendant or earrings. If the answer is a ring, then I need to ask if the ring is a cocktail ring worn occasionally or an engagement ring that will be worn every day and will experience a lot more wear and tear.

If it is an engagement stone, I recommend that they not go lower than an 8 on the Mohs’ scale of hardness.

These gem varieties include: Ruby, Sapphire, Spinel, Alexandrite, Chrysoberyl and Topaz. Of course, gemstones with hardness of 6 1/2 and up are still very suitable for wear in rings, but not on an everyday basis. Softer stones than that, I highly recommend be worn in pendants, pins or earrings. Gems softer than a 4 should be cherished more as beautiful specimens to look at but maybe not mounted in jewelry.

Sharing this type of information with your customers will help them make informed gem purchases, suitable for their lifestyle and jewelry use.

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Finer Gems Show Huge Price Increases

Monday, October 10th, 2011



The terms “world economy” and “global market” are truly brought home as we examine current prices of gems.

At present, the American consumer is competing with increased demand from many growing economies, particularly the Asian markets. The growing middle class in these countries, especially in China and India, is very large. Over the last many years, prices of gems, particularly the finer end, have been on a sharp increase. The US market has not really felt this change because demand had been rather sluggish and the existing inventory of US dealers was extensive and had not been replaced due to low sales.

As the US economy has improved and more of this existing inventory sold, dealers are now faced with restocking at the much higher world market prices set by stronger world demand. As evident also in the September Hong Kong Show, these larger than expected increases are most evident in finer Blue Sapphire and Rubies, fancy color Sapphires, Tourmalines, and many other gems. At times these gems can easily cost twice what they did just 2 years ago!

A word of caution, when giving estimates to customers or when doing appraisals of such pieces, make sure you are aware of current prices and availability, so you are not caught undervaluing or not being able to find what you had promised.

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Selling “the color”

Friday, July 2nd, 2010

Effective and highly communicative, using names of existing objects in nature or standard shared experiences is a very common way of describing specific shades of color in gemstones.

Besides the obvious, light, medium or dark adjectives, using specific references such as “grass green” or “forest green” brings to mind a more descriptive picture, helping us realize more what secondary colors might be present in the referred to green. Now we have to also be aware of what species of gems offer those shades of green or if that shade falls outside the range of colors that gem exists in. For example, both those shades can be found in Tourmalines or tsavorites, but not in Peridots, since it has more yellow in it. Greens in Emerald usually have too much blue for a “grass green” color but darker shades of Emerald could be described as “forest green”.

“Pigeon blood red” is a term reserved to describe the finest Burmese rubies, meaning that it is a rich red with a tiny tinge of pink. I have also heard the term “pomegranate seed” red used among a few dealers at a more wholesale level to describe the life and brilliance present in a fine gem ruby. The catch here seems to be that both parties should be very familiar with the standard reference used; In this case, what a ripe pomegranate seed looks like!! As you can see, this by far is not a purely scientific method and could have a lot of overlap or hits and misses, based on subjective personal experience of color.

When requesting blue sapphires of Ceylon origin the term “cornflower blue” is probably one of the most used terms in the industry, but even that reference covers quite a wide range from medium light to medium to rich shades which can amount to the difference of hundreds of dollars per carat. But, at least we know that in this case the secondary color they are requesting be present in the blue sapphire is violet.

An underlying principle of marketing and advertizing, using descriptive terms such as, names of fruits, flowers and items that are linked to romance and luxury like, chocolates, champagne, cognac, canary, sea foam, lagoon… also have the added benefit of evoking a desire and longing for ownership and partaking in that experience when used effectively. For example, naming a natural fancy color brown Zircon, cognac or chocolate or if it has lighter tones, “champagne” adds to the appeal of ownership.

Being in this business, we all know how the “right” name alone can do wonders for a gem or vice versa. Some jewelers even to this day have shared with me how they still struggle to overcome the association of “synthetic” and “manmade” with gems such as Zircons and Spinels. At times like this using geographic location descriptions helps dispel those untrue assumptions, such as “Burmese” Spinels or “Madagascar” Zircons, reminding the buyer that these gems are actually natural and mined at these actual locations.

This last JCK show, a customer at our booth sounded frustrated when she asked me why there was not a better name for “Color Change Garnet”, after I had shown her some beautiful ones from Kenya that duplicated the color change of Alexandrite. My reply was that one can always take the information that is out there as common knowledge, build on it through education and expertise and then steer the customer’s interest back to what is originally exciting about a gem, as opposed to only dwelling on what it’s name is, the same way she herself was loving the gem in front of her!!

Then of course, many species of gems themselves historically are one of the most common and standard shared experiences of color known to mankind. Other industries commonly use the name of gems to evoke luxury and romance. Lapis blue, turquoise blue, jade green, emerald green, ruby reds… are often used to describe colors of objects.

Besides the existing very scientific terminology taught by GIA to describe color and the Gemset used in the industry, communication between jewelers and colored gem dealers could also benefit from the usage of some of these terms, especially when they are following up on a request from their customer finding them that specific shade of color.

Included is a chart we have developed that helps us see the availability of gems in specific shades of colors, giving us options of gem materials and price points in order to get the colors that we want.

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