“Preferred Shades” in Color Gemstones

August 19th, 2014

PREFERREDSHADES

“Beauty is in the eye of the beholder”

This saying reminds us that personal taste ultimately determines this preference. That being said, there are different market prices for specific shades of colors based on availability and current market demands. At any given time, there is a general market consensus on what are the most preferred or desired shades of color worldwide closely linked to rarity;

Here are some general pointers to help you pick these shades of color:

  • Learn to distinguish the type of secondary colors present in the stone you are looking at, in order to determine if they are desirable ones.
  • Grays and browns are secondary colors to avoid in most gemstones, signaling de-saturated colors i.e.; think of spinels where finding vivid pure colors are difficult.
  • Pure, vivid colors are the most desired, whether in lighter or darker shades. How pure or vivid the pink or blue in the sapphire is, has the most effect on the stone’s visual appeal and price.
  • Some secondary colors are very acceptable and actually indicate origin of gemstone i.e.: violet blue in Ceylon Sapphire, pinkish red in Burma Ruby, and the different proportion of yellow or blue found in the green of Emerald, indicating Zambian or Colombian.
  • It always helps to have a master stone for comparison purposes. It is very difficult to remember color, even for seasoned buyers.
  • Gemstones with lighter body colors, like aquamarine or tanzanite are very hard to find in saturated (rich) colors, specifically in smaller sizes. For example, it would be extremely rare to find the color of a 10-carat fine tanzanite in a 1-carat stone.
  • Stay away from over dark colors as it becomes very hard to see the vibrancy of the gem. Determining the difference between rich fine color and over dark colors, is best mastered by observing many gems and constantly training your eye.
  • Be mindful of the tradeoff between saturation of color and life of the stone. These decisions can amount to thousands of dollars when looking at Rubies, Emeralds and Sapphire. You have to decide on the best combination of factors you wish present in the stone at any given price point, since the sky is the limit when it comes to perfection.
  • Each species of gem has its own specific range of colors it comes in. The more gems you look at, the more your eye will get trained to pick up on these nuances of color. Take advantage of trade shows to familiarize yourself with these ranges.
  • Light and bright is really in demand right now and vivid, neony, minty colors have a lot of appeal in current color pallets. These colors are found in Aquamarine, Afghan Tourmaline, Merelani Mint Garnet, Mahenge Spinels, Kunzite, Morganite, Chrysoberyl and more…
  • Of course, the term fancy color can get attached to many varieties of gemstones to indicate unusual shades of colors. You can pick up some good deals in this category if you have a good sense of design, color combining and offering unique and one of a kind items. You still want to make sure these gems are clean, well cut and bright.

Feel free to use our great website to browse through and familiarize yourself and your sales staff with available choices of fine color. Our website is a fantastic tool that enables your staff to make well-informed color recommendations. This education allows you to reach a large untapped market; people who love color!

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